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Tag Archives: Google Chrome

Chrome for a Cause: Results, Possible Future Projects

So glad to hear that the Chrome for a Cause project did so much good during its short run – an amazing 60,599,541 tabs donated to charity! A total of $1 million dollars was donated to the charities, with the tabs and associated dollar amounts, as well the actual equivalent charitable items, shown by this graphic from the Google Chrome Blog:

Well done, Chrome Community! The especially good news in all of this is the possibility that the program will continue; they’re currently looking at new opportunities for future Chrome for a Cause projects!

So, keep your extension installed… and this awesome community can do some more good – soon, I hope – in 2011!

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Google Chrome Blog: Browse for a good cause

Google’s Chrome community is making it very easy to do something good this Holiday Season. The new Chrome for a Cause extension will keep tabs (haha) on how many tabs you open while browsing the web every day between Dec. 15 and Dec. 19. At the end of each day, you can choose to contribute your accumulated tabs to one of five worthy causes:

  • The Nature Conservancy
  • Charity: Water
  • Doctors Without Borders
  • Un Techo para mi Pais
  • Room to Read Read more of this post

MiniPost: IE9 Browser Unsupported… On a Bing Site?

Internet Explorer Mobile Logo

Image via Wikipedia

Trying to hit the Bing Local Listings tool this morning, I ran into an issue; well, a couple of issues. Tried first with Google Chrome, no dice – browser unsupported. Tried next with Internet Explorer 9, the Beta, of course. Surprise! Again, no dice… Generates that same Unsupported Browser message, seen below:

ie9-bing-local-listings-problem

I know, I know… it’s just a Beta, but this was a little bit funny. I switched to Firefox and all was well.

Note: This is the first in a series of what I’m going to call MiniPosts(TM) and tag as such. Publicly, it is a short snippet of information, a tip, or opinion, that I will post from time to time. Privately (just between you and me) it is a short post, as I didn’t have time to write a long one.)

How to Pin Websites in Google Chrome

One of the top features I liked about the IE9 Beta, and wrote about here, was the ability to Pin a website to the Windows 7 Taskbar or Start Menu. This feature has been much touted by many reviewers and bloggers as one of the more innovative and interesting of the new IE9.

Not to say that it is not innovative (or interesting) but Google Chrome has offered this capability for some time. I am not sure exactly when it gained this capability (maybe from the outset, I cannot verify it in some rudimentary searches this evening) but you can do exactly the same thing in Chrome, albeit with more steps required.

The process in IE9 is mentioned in my post, and described quite succinctly by the very popular and useful Tweaking with Vishal blog, is very simple. Simply drag and drop an IE9 Tab or the Favicon to the Taskbar or Start Menu, and you’ve done it. Pinning a website in Google Chrome takes a couple more steps.

Pinning a Website in Google Chrome

application shortcut creation google chrome

  1. First, click the Chrome Tools (wrench) menu, then Tools, and Click “Create Application Shortcuts…”
  2. On the dialog box as shown above, check the ones you want or don’t want, and click Create.
  3. You will now have a Pinned website on the locations chosen.

Read more of this post

Top 5 Favorite Features of IE9 Beta

Someone asked me what is my favorite feature of the new IE9 Beta? I had to think a bit, and finally decided – there isn’t just one! So, after a half day or so of playing with the new IE9, here are my Top 5 Favorite Features:


1. Color-Coded Tabs

IE9 Tabbed Browsing - Color Coded!

For those web users, especially web or social media professionals who spend the better part of a day at work browsing, multiple tabs are incredibly helpful in reading pages, and opening new tabs onto new links without losing the current tab content. Technically, I don’t believe this is a “new” feature but it works really well with IE9’s lightning fast New Tab command. Read more of this post

IE9 Beta First Impressions


internet explorer IE 9 beta

IE9 Beta - Can it compete with the upstarts?

I almost always try the beta or test version of software. I am not so much into testing for testing sake, just trying out new stuff, before it is widely available. I tried the test Win95 interface for Windows NT 3.5, back before NT 3.51 adopted the new Win95 interface outright. For that matter, I took part in the Windows 95 “Preview Program” – little more than a glorified Beta test, for which I paid – $35.00? – to take part in. What was I thinking?

Ah well, with the IE9 beta, I again am trying the beta version, for the same old “trying something new” reason, plus one other… I’m curious, you see. I’ve NEVER been excited or very impressed with Microsoft’s Internet Explorer browser. Pretty much as soon as Netscape Navigator was available, I grabbed it and didn’t look back. Same with Netscape Communicator, Mozilla Firebird (yes, it was called Firebird until they had to change the name). What will the IE9 Beta bring to the browsing table? Can it compete with upstarts Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome, not to mention Opera?

I’ve always used IE, through its various iterations. The bare bones IE2, the barely can remember it IE3, IE4, which was not “that” bad… IE5, which I didn’t really like, IE6, which I pretty much hated (along with all other IT/web development folks)… then IE7, which was a big improvement over IE6, and then IE8, which, all things considered, is not a bad browser at all. Which is a good thing, considering that Microsoft’s Internet Explorer still holds nearly 65% of the browser market.  Read more of this post

Chromium Blog: Introducing Google Chrome Frame

image  Very cool tool here, and just in time for IE folks to take advantage of the upcoming ultra-communications tool Google Wave. a plug-in for Microsoft’s Internet Explorer that loads site content in a Google Chrome frame within IE. This provides a seamless updated browser experience for IE users – using the faster rendering engine of Chrome.

Developers can force pages to load in the Google Chrome Frame by adding this line of code to their pages:

<meta equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="chrome=1">

No word as yet if switching on use of the tool by default – for ALL pages – can be implemented, from what I have read so far.

Chromium Blog: Introducing Google Chrome Frame